Auto

Potholes

 traffic cone stuck in pothole

It's spring. As the ground thaws, you'll notice many more potholes on the road. Here, you'll find out how a pothole develops - and how you can avoid damage to your car.

How potholes develop

Getting to the root of the pothole begins here:

  • Rain, sleet and snow work into the soil under the pavement.
  • When the temperature drops, the water freezes and expands, pushing up the soil and pavement.
  • As thawing occurs, the water runs away and the soil recedes, creating a hole under the pavement.
  • A passing vehicle breaks the pavement causing the familiar pothole.

The weaker the pavement, the more likely potholes will develop. Areas of your car that can be subjected to damage from potholes include:

  • Wheel alignment
  • Mufflers
  • Wheel rims / Hubcaps
  • Tires
  • Suspension components
  • Shock Absorbers

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